arrow
William BLACKLER II
(-1713)
Mary ROWLES
(1680-)
William BLACKLER III
(1704-1746)
Sarah
Captain William BLACKLER IV
(1740-1818)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Mary INGALLS

2. Rebecca CHIPMAN

Captain William BLACKLER IV

  • Born: 1740, Marblehead, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA
  • Christened: 18 May 1740, Marblehead, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA
  • Marriage (1): Mary INGALLS on 18 Oct 1763 in Marblehead, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA
  • Marriage (2): Rebecca CHIPMAN on 27 Dec 1773 in Marblehead, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA
  • Died: 16 Jun 1818, Marblehead, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA aged 78
  • Buried: Waterside Cemetery, Marblehead, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA
picture

bullet  General Notes:

Extract from "Vital Records of Marblehead, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849: Vol. I -- Births" (1903)
William Blackler, son of William and Sarah, baptized May 18, 1740.

Extract from Massachusetts Marriages
Groom: William Blackler
Bride: Mary Ingalls
Marriage: 18 October 1763 at Marblehead, Essex, Massachusetts

Extract from Massachusetts Marriages
Groom: William Blackler
Bride: Rebekah Chipman
Marriage: 27 December 1773 at Marblehead, Essex, Massachusetts

Extract from "Vital Records of Marblehead, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849: Vol. II -- Marriages and Deaths" (1904)
Marblehead Marriages:
William Blackler and Mary Ingalls, Oct. 18, 1763.
William Blackler (Capt. C.R.2.) and Rebekah Chipman, Dec. 27, 1773.

Extract from "The Essex Antiquarian: Vol. IX" (1905)
William Blackler of Marblehead; capt., Col. John Glover's (Essex co.) reg.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enl. April 24, 1775; service 3 mos., 15 days; reported recommended to be commissioned June 22, 1775; also co. return dated Cambridge, Oct. 9, 1775.
William (son of William Blackler and Sarah), baptized May 18, 1740; mariner; lived in Marblehead; married Mary Ingalls Oct. 18, 1763;
Children of William and Mary, baptized in Marblehead:
1. Mary, April 28, 1765;
2. William, April 19, 1767;
3. Mary, Nov. 5, 1769;
4. Sarah, May 5, 1771;
5. Ruth, March 20, 1773.
Capt. William Blackler, merchant, lived in Marblehead, married Rebecca Chipman Dec. 27, 1773;
Children of William and Rebecca, baptized in Marblehead:
1. Rebecca, Oct. 2, 1774;
2. Nancy, Nov. 16, 1783; died Nov. 22, 1800;
3. Lucy, July 29, 1787;
4. Frances, July 19, 1789;
5. and 6. Francis and Henry (twins), Sept. 25, 1791;
7. Lydia, Jan. 5, 1794;
8. Nathaniel, July 3, 1796.

Extract from the "Lineage Book: National Society of the Daughters of the Revolution: Vol. LI" (1919)
William Blackler (1740-1818) served as captain in Col. John Glover's regiment at Long Island, and at Trenton had command of the boat in which Washington crossed the Delaware. He was lamed for life at Bemis Heights. He was born and died in Marblehead, Mass.

Extract from the "Boston Evening Transcript" dated Monday, January 20, 1908
There are descendants of Captain William Blackler living, but not many of the name. Captain William Blackler led a company from Marblehead to Boston in Essex County regiment. In an escapade on the Charles River during the siege of Boston he was severely wounded. It is the tradition of the family that he commanded the boat which carried General Washington across the Delaware River on that renowned Christmas evening. Certain it is that the Essex County regiment served at important places in the war for independence. It is said that they saved the remnants of the day after the Battle of Long Island, retreating across East River; and also in crossing the Delaware River. The men from Salem, Marblehead, Ipswich and Newburyport could row anything in the shape of a boat; they were fishermen and whalemen, brought up in sailing vessels and dories, and in the Revolutionary War were assigned places by General Washington for which he knew they were specially equipped. The brigade of General Glover's Essex County men was famous, when it came to manning a water craft or exploiting in an amateur navy. Captain William Blackler died in Marblehead, June 16, 1818, aged 78 years.

Extract from "Glover's Marblehead Regiment in the War of the Revolution" by F. A Gardner (reprinted from the Massachusetts Magazine: Vol. I, No. 2, April 1908)
(Page 7): Captain William Blackler of the 14th had command of the boat in which Gen. Washington was rowed across. The landing was made nine miles above Trenton and completed about daybreak. The advance was then made in two divisions, while the storm increased and the cold grew more bitter. The surprise of the British was complete and the capture of 918 prisoners, with stores of ammunition, brought cheers to the patriots. The evacuation of New Jersey by the British soon followed.
(Page 18): Captain William Blackler, like several other officers in this regiment, had been a member of the "Committee of Inspection" in 1774. He enlisted April 24th, 1775, and was recommended for commission, June 22nd. The honor has been accorded him of commanding the boat in which Washington crossed the Delaware. He was wounded in the Burgoyne campaign and as a result of his injuries, resigned his commission. In later years he owned and occupied the house in Marblehead in which Elbridge Gerry was born.

Extract from "Landmarks in the Old Bay State" by William R. Comer (1911)
In later years it (the Gerry House) became the property of Captain William Blackler, a veteran of the Revolution. He was a captain in Glover's regiment, and it was the proudest boast of his life that he was in command of the boat in which General Washington crossed the Delaware, on the night before the battle of Trenton.
In the roster of Glover's regiment, Blackler appears as captain of Company 2. Nothing in history refutes his claim of having been Washington's ferryman.

Extract from "Genealogical Notes sent by Aunt Lydia Blackler"
William Samuel Blackler, Esq., born 1737, died 1815; married, first, Dec. 18, 1763, Mary Ingalls, by whom he had 5 children; married, second, 1772, Rebecca Chipman, by whom he had 14 children:
1. Rebecca (b. 1774), married B. T. Reed 1800.
2. John, married Betty Prince.
3. Ward, married Betty Orne.
4. Betty, married John White
5. Nancy, unmarried.
6. Lucy, unmarried.
7. Fanny, born July 16, 1789, married Samuel Gewrry.
8. Henry, born 1791, lost at sea.
9. Francis (twin with Henry), born 1791, married Mary Ingalls Hooper 1819.
10. Lydia, married John Hooper.
Four other children died young.
The first wife, Mary Ingalls, was probably the cousin of the Mary Ingalls who married my (Lydia Hooper Blackler) Great Grandfather, Robert Hooper, in 1761. None of the descendants of the first wife survived, excepting the oldest son, William, who married a Miss Gerry. Their son, William, married Eunice Hooper, and their eldest daughter, Hannah, married Robert Hooper.

Extract from "Lydia H. Blackler's Memoir" (1903)
William Samuel Blackler, Esq., a rich and patriotic citizen of Marblehead; b. 1737, died 1815. He took an active interest in the public spirited doings of its citizens from 1773 - 78, and was one of the Committee chosen to carry into effect the resolve of the Congress as regards the non-importation of British goods. He devoted a large sum from his private fortune to enlisting "minute men" and having them properly equipped, disciplined and drilled, that they might be ready to assist in defending the Charter and Constitution of the province.
He was appointed Captain of the Company which he was so largely instrumental in raising, and was with his regiment at the disasterous battle of Long Island, when that distinguished corps performed the difficult feat which saved the American army from destruction.
He was with Glover's brigade in the successful attack upon Trenton and commanded in the perilous crossing of the Delaware river on the night of Christmas, 1776, when Washington and his army were conveyed across in the teeth of the bitter storm and cold. He was wounded in Burgoyne's expedition Oct. 7, 1778, and remaining lame, he resigned his Captain's commission, and returned to Marblehead, where he resumed his business, owning many ships engaged in the Mediterranean and Spanish trade. He died in 1815, aged 78, enjoying the universal honour and respect of his fellow citizens.
One of his ships was destroyed (about 1800) by French privateers. Claims for spoliation were made by the U.S. Government against France. These were not paid until 1897.

Extract from Massachusetts Deaths and Burials
Name: William Blackler
Birth Date: 1740
Death Date: 15 June 1818
Death Place: Marblehead, Essex, Massachusetts
Age at Death: 78

Extract from "Vital Records of Marblehead, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849: Vol. II -- Marriages and Deaths" (1904)
Marblehead Deaths
William Blackler, Capt., June 15, 1818, age 78 years. [May 18. G.R. 6; June 16, C.R.3; age 79 years. P.R.1]

Extract from Find A Grave
Name: Captain William Blackler
Birth: 1740
Death: 18 May 1818
Aged 78 yrs. "Early Vital Records of Mass. (Marblehead Deaths)"
Alternate dates & age: May 18; June 16; 79 yrs.
Burial: Waterside Cemetery, Marblehead, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA


picture

William married Mary INGALLS, daughter of Eleazer INGALLS and Sarah DIAMOND, on 18 Oct 1763 in Marblehead, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA. (Mary INGALLS was christened on 31 Oct 1742.)


picture

William next married Rebecca CHIPMAN, daughter of John CHIPMAN and Elizabeth BROWN, on 27 Dec 1773 in Marblehead, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA. (Rebecca CHIPMAN was born on 16 Oct 1752 in Marblehead, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA and died on 28 Dec 1823 in Marblehead, Essex County, Massachusetts, USA.)




Home | Table of Contents | Surnames | Name List

This Web Site was Created 6 Apr 2016 with Legacy 8.0 from Millennia